All posts by Joe Cooney

Thanksgiving Square

 

 

 

 

Arch 2.5Thanksgiving square is a complex in Dallas designed by Philip Johnson and constructed in 1976. The complex consists of a garden area, an underground pedestrian area, and a truck terminal. The name of the square generally refers to the garden area, which promotes the recognition of giving thanks as a basic human commonality. It also houses a non-denominational church that promotes the understanding and coexistence of multiple belief systems. It’s in a spiral shape with stained glass panels lining the inside of the spiral structure and below a museum dedicated to the thanksgiving tradition. It’s a beautiful and creative way to help alleviate traffic in the Dallas area.

Arch 2.4

Architeam.  (2016). Thanks-Giving Square | ArchiTravel. Retrieved November 29, 2016, from http://www.architravel.com/architravel/building/thanks-giving-square/

 

 

 

Sony Tower

Arch2.3Arch 2.2

Much like the “Lipstick Building”, Sony Tower building is a postmodern design from Philip Johnson and John Burgee. It was opened in 1984 also with the aim of contrasting the glassy boxes around it. The most iconic feature is the “Chippendale” roofline that stands out in the surrounding New York skyline. It also featured brass marble finishes and many regarded it as an ushering in of a new architectural direction for the area. They were partly influenced by the classic skyscrapers of New York City specifically their distinguished and creative roofs moving away from the modern flat roof. The first level of the building is required by zoning laws to incorporate retail and public space and was influenced by the Galleria in Milan.

McKnight, J. (2015, August 28). Postmodernism in architecture: AT&T Building by Johnson/Burgee. Retrieved November 29, 2016, from https://www.dezeen.com/2015/08/28/postmodernism-architecture-att-building-sony-tower-philip-johnson-john-burgee-new-york/

The Lipstick Building

The Lipstick Buildinghttps://en.wikiarquitectura.com/images/1/1e/Edificio_Lipstick_9.jpg

This is the “Lipstick Building” or 53rd at Third in New York City. It was designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee and was built in 1986. This postmodern office building was built to sharply contrast the surrounding architecture in every way. The red granite exterior introduces color into an otherwise drab skyline and the curvature stands along amongst boxes and rectangles. It was meant to bring high rent tenants to a less desirable neighborhood but has seemingly failed at that task. Burgee and Johnson moved their firm into the building until later selling it to Bernie Madoff who made off with billions from the 17th through 19th floor in which only about 24 people worked.

New York Architecture Images- 885 Third Ave. (n.d.). Retrieved November 29, 2016, from http://nyc-architecture.com/MID/MID012.htm

Lipstick Building. (n.d.). Retrieved November 29, 2016, from https://en.wikiarquitectura.com/index.php/Lipstick_Building

City Hall in Salinas, Puerto Rico

City Hall Salinas, PRThis building is the city hall of a smaller town in southern Puerto Rico. I chose this city hall because this is the town that my family is from. My grandfather came to the mainland US as a young teen while most of his 9 brothers and sisters stayed behind. I visited the town some years ago and I’ve missed it ever since. The town hall sticks out in this town because it’s mostly populated by smaller buildings with less intricate architecture. You can see the Spanish European influence in the design with strong white pillars lining the doorway and short almost bush like palms in the front landscape. I wish I could say the rest of the town was as beautiful looking as this simple but regal city hall building. Unfortunately, like all of Puerto Rico, Salinas has been victim to a struggling economy and has seen an increase in crime and abandonment. My grandfather’s house which was once a small beautiful little home with a mango tree in the back yard now has a metal gate and bars on the windows to discourage robbery. Hopefully this town can return to the days when all of the structures resembled the quality of this city hall. 

Salinas Puerto RicoSalinas Puerto Rico

Bizzell Library

Bizzell LibraryWe all know and love the Biz! This building is without a doubt among the most iconic on campus. The cherokee gothic style that we discussed in class really conveys a Bizzell Library 2sense of distinguished academia. I know when I first visited the campus this building caught my eye more than anything. The interior is as complex and beautiful as the exterior and the great reading room almost takes your breath away as you sit in silence. I’ve spent less time in this building than I probably should have over the last few years but I’ve still had my fair share of long, dreadful, and memorable nights here. It’s the centerpiece to the whole campus and with good reason.

One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center
One World Trade Center

Like most Americans, this building invokes a lot of thought and emotion in me. The message and the story of this building are quite obvious but to see it in person is to really experience it. Built to 1776 feet, the modern looking tower thrusts into the New York sky like a beacon over the city. You would think it would be lost in the sea of towering steel that is Manhattan but you can feel its presence as soon as you spot it. It’s a truly fitting and patriotic memorial to the tragic events but also to American’s unbreakable spirit and will. Ive had the opportunity to see it in person and its captivating. Especially the massive entryway.

My Home In Texas

My Home In Texas
My Home In Texas

I discovered I have no actual photos of my house so this is a google earth screenshot of my house in Katy, TX. This house is important to me because it was home in a foreign place. Moving to Texas from Pennsylvania felt like moving to the moon but over the years I grew to love Texas from right inside this home. The style of the houses in my neighborhood were just as foreign as the rest of Texas to me. I wasn’t used to the idea of everyone having a required number of trees in their yard or seeing house after house made of different colored brick. My neighborhood is designed to have a desert theme and it’s built on the flattest of rice fields which, again, were total adjustments for me. Like I said, I grew to love Texas and this house was the starting point. I vividly remember coming home at 3 a.m. and crawling under the garage door or the block parties we held just steps from the driveway. I think that was the main difference to me between the places I’ve lived. This house, this neighborhood, and this town seemed so much more inclusive. I grew to love Texas through the people I met and the community I became a part of. All right here in this house.

Philadelphia City Hall

Philadelphia City Hall
Philadelphia City HallPhiladelphia City Hall Front

This is a picture of Philadelphia City hall. I grew up just west of the city and most of my family still lives in the city so we have spent quite a bit of time there. This building always stood out to me for several reasons. First, I’ve always looked up to my grandfather who works for a congressman in the city and i’ve always associated the building with him and his work. The second reason is another association I made with the history of the city itself. The second empire architecture reminds me of European parliamentary and government buildings highlighting the influence of European society in our roots. Its iconic. It embodies the story and the spirit of the city as a whole. Today, much like the Alamo, it’s surrounded by more modern architecture and you likely won’t even see it until you’re right on top of it but I don’t think that’s spoiled it. William Penn stands resolute over the grand experiment  of America and no amount of progress has disrupted the story or vision of this building.

 

My elementary school was a scary church

Saint Aloysius Church - Pottstown, PA
Saint Aloysius Church – Pottstown, PA

This is Saint Aloysius Church in Pottstown, PA. This church brings back many memories of my childhood and many of them, ill admit, are less than pleasant. I grew up in Pottstown and attended the school attached to the church. As you can imagine this was a strict and serious environment and I was quite the opposite as a kid. To this day the imposing gothic revival style of the church reminds of an even smaller me opening the heavy wooden doors and walking through the seemingly massive, silent, and overly ornate entryway. Something about marble and stained glass makes me fearful of a swift backhand from a disgruntled nun.

Saint Aloysius Schoolhouse
Saint Aloysius Schoolhouse